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NSF honors IUPUI researcher with highly competitive early-career grant

The National Science Foundation has awarded a Faculty Early Career Development Award to a School of Science researcher Julia Arciero who will use the grant to improve understanding of disease treatment.

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. -- The National Science Foundation has awarded a Faculty Early Career Development Award to a School of Science researcher Julia Arciero who will use the grant to improve understanding of disease treatment.

The awards, also known as NSF CAREER Awards, are among the most prestigious given to early-career faculty. Recipients have the potential to serve as academic role models in research and education and to lead advances in their departments or organizations. The grants are intended to support activities that build a foundation for a lifetime in academics.

"NSF early-career grants are among the most competitive research awards available to scientists launching their independent research careers," said IU Vice President for Research Fred H. Cate. "Recipients are widely recognized as leaders charting new paths in their respective fields.

Arciero, an assistant professor of mathematical sciences in the School of Science at IUPUI, was awarded $599,278 for research to improve the understanding and treatment of peripheral arterial disease, in which partial blockage of arteries can cause severe health problems. The five-year project began May 1, 2017.

Peripheral arterial disease affects more than 10 million Americans and is expected to become more prevalent with the aging of the population. The disease results when arterial blockage reduces blood and oxygen delivery to the patient's calf and foot, leading to pain and tissue loss.

The project will develop a mathematical model to predict how short-term and long-term blood vessel adaptations impact blood flow after a blockage. It has the potential to transform the understanding of peripheral arterial disease and pinpoint the most effective targets and timing for effective treatment. High school, undergraduate and graduate students will be involved in the research.

National Science Foundation CAREER Awards were first awarded in 1995 and replaced previous foundation award programs for early-career researchers. The program embodies the foundation's commitment to supporting the integration of research and education, and recipients are required to incorporate teaching, learning and dissemination of knowledge into their projects.

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The School of Science at IUPUI is committed to excellence in teaching, research and service in the biological, physical, computational, behavioral and mathematical sciences. The School is dedicated to being a leading resource for interdisciplinary research and science education in support of Indiana's effort to expand and diversify its economy.

(Written by: Cindy Fox Aisen)